My Tumblr Art Selection
blastedheath:

Sven Erixson (Swedish, 1899-1970), Palms and lilies, 1929. Oil on canvas, 54 x 65 cm.

blastedheath:

Sven Erixson (Swedish, 1899-1970), Palms and lilies, 1929. Oil on canvas, 54 x 65 cm.

kutxx:

3.
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Great Lovers (Mr and Miss Hembus)
1930, oil on canvas, Kirchner Museum, Davos, Switzerland

kutxx:

3.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Great Lovers (Mr and Miss Hembus)

1930, oil on canvas, Kirchner Museum, Davos, Switzerland

chloefrancillon:

Francis Picabia (1879-1953) Portrait d’Yvette, 1942-43

chloefrancillon:

Francis Picabia (1879-1953) Portrait d’Yvette, 1942-43

whenyouwereapostcard:

Arthur Wesley Dow Spring Landscape with a Farmer and White Horse 1892

whenyouwereapostcard:

Arthur Wesley Dow
Spring Landscape with a Farmer and White Horse
1892

duskyhuedladysatan:

by Norwegian conceptual artist Rune Guneriussen

TEA PARTY

the-paintrist:

artpedia:

Albert Gleizes - Portrait of Jacques Nayral, 1911. 
Oil on canvas 

Portrait of Jacques Nayral (also known as Portrait de Jacques Nayral), is a large oil painting created in 1911 by the French artist, theorist and writer Albert Gleizes (1881–1953). It was exhibited in Paris at the Salon d’Automne of 1911 (no. 609), the Salon de la Section d’Or, 1912 (no. 38), and reproduced in Du “Cubisme” written by Jean Metzinger and Albert Gleizes in 1912, the first and only manifesto on Cubism. Metzinger in 1911 described Gleizes’ painting as ‘a great portrait’. In 1913 it was reproduced in Les Peintres Cubistes by Guillaume Apollinaire. Portrait of Jacques Nayral, one of Gleizes’ first major Cubist works, while still ‘readable’ in the figurative or representational sense, exemplifies the mobile, dynamic fragmentation of form characteristic of Cubism at the outset of 1911. Highly sophisticated in theory and in practice, this aspect of simultaneity would soon become identified with the practices of the Section d’Or. Here Gleizes deploys these techniques in a radical, personal and coherent manner. Purchased in 1979, the painting is exhibited in the permanent collection of the Tate Modern in London.
Jacques Nayral (a pseudonym for Joseph Houot) was a young modernist poet, dramatist, publisher and occasional sports writer, who shared with Gleizes a passion for the theories of Henri Bergson. He was a friend of Gleizes and married his sister Mireille in 1912. Gleizes began work on his portrait in 1910. The interfusion and interrelation between the sitter and the background of the painting reflect Bergson’s concepts about the simultaneity of experience. It was avant-garde works such as this widely exhibited portrait that fed the public outcry against Cubism. “Its scale echoes the large-scale paintings of the official exhibitions, while its style subverts that tradition”. (Tate Modern)

the-paintrist:

artpedia:

Albert GleizesPortrait of Jacques Nayral, 1911.

Oil on canvas 

Portrait of Jacques Nayral (also known as Portrait de Jacques Nayral), is a large oil painting created in 1911 by the French artist, theorist and writer Albert Gleizes (1881–1953). It was exhibited in Paris at the Salon d’Automne of 1911 (no. 609), the Salon de la Section d’Or, 1912 (no. 38), and reproduced in Du “Cubisme” written by Jean Metzinger and Albert Gleizes in 1912, the first and only manifesto on Cubism. Metzinger in 1911 described Gleizes’ painting as ‘a great portrait’. In 1913 it was reproduced in Les Peintres Cubistes by Guillaume Apollinaire. Portrait of Jacques Nayral, one of Gleizes’ first major Cubist works, while still ‘readable’ in the figurative or representational sense, exemplifies the mobile, dynamic fragmentation of form characteristic of Cubism at the outset of 1911. Highly sophisticated in theory and in practice, this aspect of simultaneity would soon become identified with the practices of the Section d’Or. Here Gleizes deploys these techniques in a radical, personal and coherent manner. Purchased in 1979, the painting is exhibited in the permanent collection of the Tate Modern in London.

Jacques Nayral (a pseudonym for Joseph Houot) was a young modernist poet, dramatist, publisher and occasional sports writer, who shared with Gleizes a passion for the theories of Henri Bergson. He was a friend of Gleizes and married his sister Mireille in 1912. Gleizes began work on his portrait in 1910. The interfusion and interrelation between the sitter and the background of the painting reflect Bergson’s concepts about the simultaneity of experience. It was avant-garde works such as this widely exhibited portrait that fed the public outcry against Cubism. “Its scale echoes the large-scale paintings of the official exhibitions, while its style subverts that tradition”. (Tate Modern)

workman:

centerforartandthought: Thinking Man. 1977. Oil on canvas 115 by 89 cm. Ang Kiukok (via Artfact)

workman:

centerforartandthoughtThinking Man. 1977. Oil on canvas 115 by 89 cm. Ang Kiukok (via Artfact)

tittanoir:

 Olaf Hajek

tittanoir:

 Olaf Hajek

The Lady

Nihan Büyüksezer
jordanelse:

Piece for Words and Views I-XXXVI, Jorinde Voigt, David Nolan Gallery, New York, 2012.

jordanelse:

Piece for Words and Views I-XXXVI, Jorinde Voigt, David Nolan Gallery, New York, 2012.